Diaphragm Development and Congenital Hernias

The diaphragm is an essential mammalian skeletal muscle, as it is required for respiration and serves as a barrier between the thoracic and abdominal cavities. The Kardon lab used sophisticated mouse genetic studies to establish that the diaphragm arises from multiple embryonic tissues. Continue reading → Diaphragm Development and Congenital Hernias

Vascular Inflammation in Malaria Pathogenesis

The pathogenesis of malaria is characterized by vascular inflammation exacerbated by immune cells that travel to areas where red blood cells infected with parasites stick to the endothelium lining the blood vessels. The Lamb lab has made significant discoveries demonstrating a key role for receptor tyrosine kinase family Eph receptors in malaria pathogenesis. Continue reading → Vascular Inflammation in Malaria Pathogenesis

Defining Pathways for Bone Destruction and Preservation in Cancer

Bone destruction occurs during aging and numerous diseases, such as osteoporosis and cancer. Many cancer patients, including those with breast-to-bone metastasis, have bone osteolysis that is refractory to state-of-the-art treatments. Continue reading → Defining Pathways for Bone Destruction and Preservation in Cancer