An EHR Clinical Support App for Monitoring Bilirubin Levels

Electronic health records (EHR) are a rich source of clinical and research data, but clinicians and researchers often cannot access this information efficiently. The Department of Biomedical Informatics has developed the ReImagineEHR initiative to improve the functionality of electronic health record systems. Continue reading → An EHR Clinical Support App for Monitoring Bilirubin Levels

Inhibiting Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) in Immune Injury and Pathologic Clotting

Deficient or excess immune system activities cause many human diseases. To understand the mechanisms of immune injury and their links to pathologic clotting, University of Utah Health investigators Christian Yost, MD, Guy Zimmerman, MD, and colleagues defined features of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Continue reading → Inhibiting Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) in Immune Injury and Pathologic Clotting

Translating Influenza Immunization in Pregnancy into Infant Immunity

Infants with influenza are at increased risk for adverse outcomes, particularly in the first six months when they are unable to mount a sufficient response to influenza immunization. Few large-scale studies have evaluated the impact of maternal immunization during pregnancy on subsequent infant influenza outcomes. To address this gap, Julie Shakib, DO, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study of 245,386 pregnant women and their infants over nine influenza seasons. They found that infants born to women reporting influenza immunization during pregnancy had risk reductions of 70% for influenza infection and 81% for influenza hospitalization in the first six months. Continue reading → Translating Influenza Immunization in Pregnancy into Infant Immunity

Lowering Body Temperature After Cardiac Arrest

Hypothermia (lowering the body temperature to subnormal levels) after cardiac arrest became standard practice in adult and neonatal critical care in the early 2000s, but its benefits in children were unknown. To answer this question, University of Utah Health researcher J. Michael Dean, MD, and colleagues conducted two randomized trials (in-hospital and out-of-hospital) at 38 U.S. and international sites, comparing hypothermia with normothermia—maintenance of normal body temperature—after cardiac arrest. Over 4,000 children were screened and 624 participated in the trials. In both trials, researchers found no benefit from hypothermia versus normothermia. Continue reading → Lowering Body Temperature After Cardiac Arrest